For the creature origin from D&D 4th edition, see Creature type#Shadow.

A shadow is a humanoid creature made from darkness.

Description[edit | edit source]

Appearance[edit | edit source]

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Personality and alignment[edit | edit source]

Shadows are always chaotic evil.

Abilities and traits[edit | edit source]

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Ecology[edit | edit source]

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Environment[edit | edit source]

Lair[edit | edit source]

Life cycle[edit | edit source]

Diet[edit | edit source]

Society and culture[edit | edit source]

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Relationships and family[edit | edit source]

Organization[edit | edit source]

Enemies[edit | edit source]

Allies and minions[edit | edit source]

Religion[edit | edit source]

Language[edit | edit source]

Shadows cannot speak in any understandable way.

Treasure[edit | edit source]

Harvesting[edit | edit source]

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History[edit | edit source]

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Notable shadows[edit | edit source]

For a full list of shadows, see Category:Shadows.

Related creatures[edit | edit source]

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Publication history[edit | edit source]

Original D&D[edit | edit source]

The shadow first appeared in Greyhawk (Supplement 1) (1975). In Original Dungeons & Dragons, they were not technically undead, and were not affected by items that targeted undead.

Basic D&D[edit | edit source]

The shadow was included in the Basic Set (Holmes) (1977), where they were lawful evil and immune to the cleric ability to turn undead.

In the Basic Set (Moldvay) (1981) and the Basic Rules (BECMI) (1983), they had the chaotic alignment, but were still not technically undead. This version was updated and included in the Rules Cyclopedia (1991). The AC9 Creature Catalogue (1986) and Rules Cyclopedia both assigned the shadow to the monster creature type.

AD&D 1st edition[edit | edit source]

The shadow was introduced for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 1st edition in the Monster Manual (1e) (1977), where they were chaotic evil undead.

AD&D 2nd edition[edit | edit source]

The 1st edition shadow was updated for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd edition for the Monstrous Compendium Volume One (1989). It was also included in the Monstrous Manual (1993).

D&D 3rd edition[edit | edit source]

The 2nd edition shadow was included in both the Monster Manual (3.0) (2000) and Monster Manual (3.5) (2003). It was made available as a character race in Savage Species (2003).

D&D 4th edition[edit | edit source]

The shadow appeared in the Monster Manual 3 (4e) (2010), which detailed the shadow stalker, shadow strangler, and shadow puppeteer. In Dungeons & Dragons 4th edition, shadows were not undead, but instead humanoids with the shadow origin and the evil alignment.

D&D 5th edition[edit | edit source]

The shadow appeared in Monster Manual (5e) (2014), where they were once again chaotic evil undead.

Creative origins[edit | edit source]

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Reception and influence[edit | edit source]

In his review of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 1st edition's Monster Manual in White Dwarf, Don Turnbull was disappointed that the shadow was changed into an undead creature: "I used to enjoy seeing clerics vainly trying to turn what wouldn't turn, when Shadows were first met."[1]

Like most D&D 3.5 monsters, the shadow was imported into Paizo's Pathfinder role-playing game. Additional details on shadows in Pathfinder's continuity were provided in the sourcebook Undead Revisited (2011).

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Open Box, White Dwarf #8 (August/September 1978), p.16-17.
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