The quaggoth, also known as a deep bear for its furry appearance, is a subterranean bestial humanoid creature. They are commonly encountered in the Underdark of multiple worlds, including Faerûn and Oerth.

The name "quaggoth" is pronounced "KWAG-uth", with emphasis on the "quag".[1]

Description[edit | edit source]

Appearance[edit | edit source]

Quaggoths are about seven feet tall and covered in shaggy white hair, though brown-haired quaggoths are sometimes seen.

Personality and alignment[edit | edit source]

Quaggoths are usually neutral in alignment.

Abilities and traits[edit | edit source]

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Ecology[edit | edit source]

Environment[edit | edit source]

Quaggoths usually live in underground lairs.

Life cycle[edit | edit source]

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Society and culture[edit | edit source]

Organization[edit | edit source]

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Quaggoths are savage, bestial hunters who live in nomadic tribes.

Quaggoths are sometimes enslaved by other races, notably drow.

Enemies[edit | edit source]

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Allies[edit | edit source]

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Language[edit | edit source]

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Cultural significance[edit | edit source]

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Notable quaggoths[edit | edit source]

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Variants and related creatures[edit | edit source]

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History[edit | edit source]

Quaggoths in Greyhawk[edit | edit source]

In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting, quaggoths live in cold regions above ground. They are most commonly found in the Forlorn Forest, but have also been encountered in Blackmoor, the Burneal Forest, the Cold Marshes, the Hraak Forest, and the lands of the Tiger and Wolf Nomads. In ancient times, the quaggoths were far more numerous, but thousands were slain by elves in the War of Extermination.

The most notable quaggoth in the Flanaess is Shag Solomon, a "civilized" quaggoth who plays a minor role in the Age of Worms adventure path.

Publication history[edit | edit source]

AD&D 1st edition[edit | edit source]

The quaggoth first appeared in Fiend Folio (1e) (1981), p.74, which described that little is known about the species.

They were later mentioned in the World of Greyhawk Fantasy Game Setting (1983).

Quaggoth appear in Forest of Doom, Dragon #73 (May 1983).

AD&D 2nd edition[edit | edit source]

Quaggoth are detailed in the MC14 Monstrous Compendium: Fiend Folio Appendix (1992), credited to writer Tim Beach. They appear in the Monstrous Manual (1993), p.298.

A number of them appear in Night Below (1995).

Quaggoth are mentioned in several Forgotten Realms sourcebooks, including the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2e) (1993), City of Splendors (1994), Drizzt Do'Urden's Guide to the Underdark (1999), Heroes' Lorebook (1996), and Skullport (2e) (1999).

Quaggoth are mentioned briefly in the Council of Wyrms (1994) box set and the Council of Wyrms Setting (1999). They are described in Player's Option: Combat & Tactics (1995) as "ogre" type creatures, larger than humans but smaller than giants. They are briefly mentioned in the Player's Guide to Greyhawk (1998),

The horn of war, which summons an army of quaggoths, appears in Encyclopedia Magica Volume Four (1995), p.1549, having previously appeared in Dragon #145 (May 1989).

Quaggoth are described in Primitive PCs, Dragon #265 (Nov 1999).

They appear in Ancient Blood, Dungeon Magazine #20, Kingdom of the Ghouls, Dungeon Magazine #70, and Divisions of the Mind, Dungeon Magazine #81.

D&D 3rd edition[edit | edit source]

The quaggoth are detailed in Drow of the Underdark (3e) (2007), p.136-139 and Underdark (3e) (2003).

The Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (3e) (2001) describes the quaggoth as inhabiting the Underdark. The Grand History of the Realms (2007) mentions them as having their own nation long ago around the year -1800 DR. Some appear in Lords of Darkness (3e) (2001). Statistics for playing them appear in Player's Guide to Faerûn, Web Enhancement (2004), p.6, which places them as having a level adjustment of +2. They are briefly mentioned in Races of Faerûn (2003) and the Dragons of Faerûn (2006) web enhancement.

Quaggoth appear in Shadowdale: The Scouring of the Land (2007) and The Shattered Gates of Slaughtergarde (2006).

They appear in Dragon Hunters, Dungeon Magazine #104, Backdrop: Diamond Lake, Dungeon Magazine #124, and Backdrop: Alhaster, Dungeon Magazine #131.

D&D 4th edition[edit | edit source]

Quaggoth statistics appear in Underdark (4e) (2010). They are mentioned in Menzoberranzan (4e) (2012), and spoken of in passing in Winning Races: Mules, Dragon #391 (Sep 2010) and Dungeon Magazine #177.

D&D 5th edition[edit | edit source]

Quaggoth appear in the Monster Manual (5e) (2014).

They appear in the adventure modules Out of the Abyss (2015), Waterdeep: Dungeon of the Mad Mage (2018). They are mentioned in Volo's Guide to Monsters (2016).

Creative origins[edit | edit source]

Reception and influence[edit | edit source]

In Fiend Folio Findings: Flat taste didn't go away, Dragon #55 (Nov 1981), Ed Greenwood criticized the AD&D 1st edition Fiend Folio overall, but spoke well of the quaggoth:

"The second large problem found in the Folio has to do with races: too many of them, that is. Some new races such as the Firenewt, Flind, Forlarren, Norker, Quaggoth and Skulk may assme a comfortable place in the AD&D bestiary rolls. Others, such as the Crabman, Booka, and Bullywug, leave one desirous of more information as to their social life and activities, but are adequate."

References[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Ay pronunseeAyshun gyd, Dragon #93 (Jan 1985).
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