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"Oh, most wonderful! New challengers!"
— Hespotherad

Hespotherad is an fey prince best known for his fondness of games.[1]

Appearance and personality[]

Hespotherad wears exceptionally fine clothes in bright and clashing colors. He is a whimsical creature with a sing-song voice. He carries a longsword.

He is obsessed with games, and holds himself to be exceptionally skilled. He does not expect to be beaten, and becomes outraged if defeated. He takes gaming seriously, and likewise is insulted if an opponent takes it easy on him, attempts to cheat, or refuses to play. On occasion, he is known to exact later vengeance on his opponents.

He is skilled at bluffing and a difficult opponent to read. He is careful, however, and will teleport to safety if his life is certainly in danger rather than fight to the death.

Abilities[]

Hespotherad can summon a game board on a whim, and happily plays with new players.

As a fey prince, he is exceptionally powerful, and does not even fear the minions of the lich Acererak. His deadly magic primarily uses clouds of poison and psychic energy, both of which he is immune to. He can poison a creature with a gaze alone.

He prepares defensive magic to ensure his safety in case tide of battle turn against him, he can teleport to safety.

Lair[]

Hespotherad's true home is unknown.

History[]

Hespotherad once occupied a section of the Dead Gods' Tomb, a network of ancient shrines to fallen deities. Finding it inhabited by distasteful fey loyal to the lich Acererak, he slaughtered them all and took up residence in the chamber hoping to find a challenging board game opponents.

Publication history[]

Hespotherad appeared in Tomb of Horrors (4e) (2010), p.142-143.

References[]

  1. Tomb of Horrors (4e) (2010), p.142-143.
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